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. they're opposed to iraq. lastly saddam hussein was a stable regime and it hadn't in recent years been aggressive. but nonetheless, if you're sitting in london or paris, you're thinking, oh, my god, another intervention at a time when our military is losing strength, not gaining strength. >> exactly. and it's interesting to see the u.s. response being very cautious. we'll hear from the president on monday whether he makes a big policy statement on this, perhaps unlikely. but for the bridge stickersel here and to go back to david cameron, wa kind of pressure is on him to formulate a response here? not only in this event, but for the next round of activity to unfold. >> it's a very fast-moving situation. i think their first response was to try to be supportive to -- not too supportive, send a couple of planes, send our own troops. however, if a lot of troops have been killed in the algerian situation, if the mali thing gets out of hand, there may be pressure to rachet up the response. president obama's response is incredibly important. all of the signals we've been getting from the white
can continue to flow. lastly, the president began his address with this declare tiff statement. >> raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay for spending that congress has already committed to. >> reporter: the statement is true. while the debt ceiling enhances our ability to spend, federal budget resolutions originate where the congress must ultimately approve them. what will happen if the congress doesn't move to raise the debt ceiling? there's two possible scenarios. the government waits until it has enough money to pay all its obligations for a single day and then it sends out payments late or, two, it can pick and choose winners until the situation gets resolved. president obama's warning of a near total government shutdown is untrue. sam brock, nbc bay area news. >>> some good insight there. president obama also addressed gun control. he wants universal background checks and a ban on assault rifles. nbc bay area's janelle wang has more in our world tonight. >>> tomorrow vice president joe biden is expected to bring simi
quality assurance. third, poor security. fourth, questionable sustainability. lastly, corruption. let's talk about inadequate planning. we are at risk now of wasting billions of dollars if the agencies charged with implementing new programs and constructing new facility is to not first answer some basic questions. i have been in washington 30 something years. i almost fell off the stage. i came from ohio. maybe i keep this midwestern approach to issues, sort of basic simple questions that you would ask if you were buying a house, buying a car, or trying to lecture your daughter on what school to attend. sort of simple questions, logical questions. these questions are not being asked first -- are not being answered, i should say, in afghanistan. questions such as, are these programs and buildings needed? have you asked the afghans if they want them? have you coordinated it with any of the other organizations working for either of the u.s. government or the international community? have we designed them to meet any specific need that the afghans have? and have redesigned them in such a
humanity that it has to cure. lastly, wake up to the idea that the iranians themselves have told us what a intend in a nuclear exchange. again, the president said, the application of an atomic bomb would not leave anything in israel. the same thing would just produce damages in the muslim world. in other words, israel would forever and instantly be wiped off the map, whereas the muslim nation of 1.8 billion people would indoor with some damage. endure with some damage. y that itssly applie worked in the past, it will work in the future is unwarranted. we are assured by the other side that deterrence will work. they do not know, and we do not know if it will work or not. imagine the risk if they are wrong. 6 million jews are dead. the eradication of israel. hyper proliferation in the middle east and iranian domination of the middle east and the oil economy of the world. do any of you want to live with that? thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, it is clear why people have called this debate one of the toughest global foreign-policy challenges of a generation. the have h
. the saudis would line the deserts with arrows saying this way. lastly, i'm running out of time, i hope, perhaps you will resist from applauding at six-minute mark, or at least the 60% who are not sympathetic to our view and drown out the others. this is a regime that has threatened to annihilate israel and expressed its intentions to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a continental nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better henry kissinger re did not get away with it either. >> thank you for that introduction. it is a -- introduction it is a pleasure being here. it goes without saying that the world would be better if iran does not become a nuclear arms state. achieving that goal should be our principle priority going forward.
casualty. >> and lastly, i want to ask you, france has a lot of important areas in that region, specifically pertaining to their uranium, they extract from some of those countries. i know that french special forces have been right in niger. they immediately go to where these rich natural resources exist in these countries that they need. are you worried about this becoming sort of an economic war, kind of like what we saw in iraq for oil, this idea of these imperialists coming to get the resources and that's what al qaeda can use as a real, a recruiting tool? >> well, luke, you make a great point. we're only going to achieve security and stability in mali and niger, in mowauritania, in this whole region if we address and help those governments address those long-standing internal disputes. it's because of 50 years of complaints and disputes in northern mali that this whole destabilization of mali began in the first place. we have to have elections that restore a legitimate democratic government in mali and the malian government itself needs to address the real concerns and comp
cloud. where it could launch new games in 2013. lastly, a lot of movement ahead of the j.p. morgan health coence next week. which is referred to as the super bowl of healthcare. one of the mover and shakers is expected to be celgene. we are seeing stocks higher than next week. >> thank you seema, very much. >>> to the bond market. find out what traders make of the latest jobs report. not to mention the bullard comment at the top of "power lunch." rick santelli at nyse. hi, rick. >> we were close to 197 1/2. we closed last week at 170. it's been 22 basis point week and for a while over a quarter point. that's pretty large. if you open the chart up, 194 is about the cusp. whether when we close today we are at highest yield since later may or late april. you can see that chart. now sometimes when the treasury market sells off aggressively, it even catches markets off guard. not only investors. think about high yield investment grade. if you look at the inest vmt grade index, you can see the knee jerk reaction is a narrowing of the spreads because corporates didn't sell off as aggressi
korean shares. i.t. stocks and development ralliers pushed higher .4%. lastly, india's sensex in action, trading a touch below the line. back to you. >> all right. thanks, catch you later. >>> as we head to break, you should head over to our web site to find out why a number of economists believe tomorrow's ecb rate-setting meeting could mark a key moment in the evolution of the eurozone debt crisis. >>> and forget alcoa in the u.s. earnings season. watch out for europe's corporate performance. more on that story. >>> also, go to cnbc.com for the latest on the online hacking of u.s. banks and why the u.s. government thinks iran is behind it all. >>> keep your eyes that. still to come, ubs executives due to testify before the british parliament today on the libel scandal. we'll have a preview when we come back. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in t
sustainability and lastly, corruption. let's talk about inadequate planning. we are at risk now of wasting billions of dollars if the agencies charged with implementing new programs and constructing new facilities do not first answer some basic questions. now i have been in washington for 30 some years. i almost fell off the stage. [laughter] i came from ohio. and maybe i keep this midwestern approach to issues, the basic simple questions that you would ask if you are buying a house, buying a car or trying to lecture your daughter on what school to go to. simple questions, logical questions. these questions aren't being asked or i should say aren't being answered in afghanistan. questions such as are these programs and buildings needed? have you asked the afghans if they want them? have you coordinated with any of the other organizations working for either the u.s. government or the international community? have we designed them to meet any specific needs that the afghans have? and have we designed them in such a way that they can be sustainable in the future? quite often, we find the answ
-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i'm sorry. i don't want to be rude. you and i are very good friends. i know my time's going to expire. others are going to ask why you did this. i was asking for the accuracy. if you don't want to answer that's fine. >> i did vote against it and i was going to explain why i voted against it. >> i know. they will be ask
the saudis would line the desert with directional arrows saying this way to tehran. now, lastly, and i'm running out of time. i hope perhaps you'll desist from applauding at the six minute mark or at least the 60% of you who aren't sympathetic to our view -- who are sympathetic to our view and drown out the others. is that this is a regime that has threatened to inile late israel and express its intentions to do so. we are our -- we have to rely on deterrence because it worked on the cold war. it was radically different. it was not existential. and the target the united states was a continental nation of great size israel is a one-bomb country. that's a very strong 27% i commend you on your energy there. i will stop here and say there's a radical difference between the soviet-u.s. relationship and relationship of israel and iran. and you will not ask 6 million jews in israel to rely on their existence on deterrents in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles if i would it would make you feel any better henry kissinger didn't get away with it, either. >> good evening. tha
it is the federal law enforcement driving the rogue industry? >> yes. >> and lastly, will the federal establishment be sensitive to the economic issues? >> that's an important set of questions. i don't talk about the federal system as much because they are on the opposite trajectory. so the federal system as was just mentioned is actually expanding. the bureau of prisons budget actually expanded this past year. it is going kind of counter to the direction of the states are going, and the aclu sponsored a couple of hearings on, where states leaders from state that i do have enacted significant reform presented, presented the story of what happened in their state in trying to try to motivate reform in the federal system. the reality is the economic pressures facing the states don't exist in the same way as they do with the federal government. the federal government isn't getting that same pinch. state governments have to balance their budget. the federal government doesn't, and so there are fewer pressures on the federal government to actually have to deal with this as a cost-saving measure. the real
would line the desert with directional ar o'o's saying -- arrows saying this way to tehran. now, lastly, and i'm running out of time, i hope perhaps you'll resist from applauding at the six-minute mark or at least the 60% of who you are sympathetic to our view. [laughter] drown out the others. is that this is a regime that has threatened to anye light israel and expressed -- annihilate israel and has expressed its intention to do so. we have to rely on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was radically different. the soviets had an ideological argument with the united states. it was not ex stention. and the target. united states was a continental nation of great size. israel is a one-bomb country. [applause] that's a very strong 27th -- 27%. i commend you on your energy. i will stop here and say there's a radical difference between the soviet-u.s. relationship and the relationship with israel and iran and you will not ask six million jews in israel to rely for their existence on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. [applause] >> if it makes yo
't seen, charles alluded to this lastly, are the social dislocation talks of this. that is to say, when we started "the weekly standard" in 1995, the worst, very good piece, but would make you laugh if you would like to look at it was by a criminologist and sociologist was called here come the super predators. and the argument was that we had created a generation of 17-year-olds, youth, whose fathers had been in prison, never seen a strong family, none of that. and basically they were on the way to creating a crime wave the likes of which we had never seen. that is one of the great humbling moments of my life as an editor. wonderful piece, perfectly argued and it made absolute sense at the time that we published it. and it was so wildly wrong that it's not 18 years later. you know, we have now lived through a 20 year decline in crime. new york city last week, not one person was killed last week in new york city. that sounds like you should celebrate something like that. >> that's a big. >> john has been out of town. >> that's right. someone mispronounce my name and i was -- but it's a real
theft and tend hiring of future unauthorized workers and lastly, we establish an improved process for e admitting future workers to serve our work force needs while protecting all workers. other bipartisan senators have stood in the same spot before trumpeting similar proposals. but we believe this will be the year congress finally gets it done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there is more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. we believe we have a window of opportunity to act. but we will only succeed if the effort is bipartisan. by their presence today, my republican colleagues are making a significant statement about the need to fix our broken immigration system. we democrats are equally serious. we do not want immigration as a wedge issue. much rather we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problem and becomes law. we recognize that in order to pass bipartisan legislation none of us can get everything we want. that's why our framework says we can address the status of people living here illegally whil
employer or position or perhaps it's something down the road. >> lastly -- unlike the unhappy guys in the movie office space, embrace all sorts of technology. >> by the year 2020, over 75% of jobs will have a technology component. i think that's important for people to understand for longevity and employment of the future. >> staying employed this year will be easier in some fields than in others. for example, jobs in health care and business services like sales are expected to be plentiful. as 2013 goes on, the job market is predicted to pick up steam. setting the stage for better days in the next new year. cnn, washington. >> preparing to fly a plane to new york is pulled from the cockpit for smelling like alcohol. we are following the development. stay with us. you are in "the situation room." s customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this
years serving for u.s.a. and lastly, four years you count or you don't want. there is no information about where or when the photos were taken. his wife says it's not clear why they were sent. >> i have no idea what purpose they serve, which is why we held onto them so long. i'm releasing them now to make sure that people are aware that he is still in someone's custody, and i believe it's the iranians and has not been released, and it is almost six years an is still not home with his family. >> reporter: u.s. officials also believe that he is being held by iran. he was working as a private investigator and last seen on an iranian island before he disappeared. u.s. investigators say the expertise used to cover up the track of the email sender looks like the work of professionals, such as iran's intelligence and security service. iran meanwhile has repeatedly denied any involvement in the abduction. his former employer the f.b.i. has posted a million dollar reward for information leading to his return. they say the agency is quote, doing all we can to bring bob home safe. next month hi
. third, poor security. fourth, questionable sustainability and lastly, corruption. talk about inadequate planning. we are. we are at a risk billions of dollars if the agencies charged with implementing new programs and can start two new facilities do not first answer some basic questions. i've been in washington for 37 years. how must sell at this stage. they came from ohio and keep this midwestern approach to issues come assertive basic simple questions that you would ask if you are buying a house, buying a car or train to lecture your daughter on what school to pick. set up a simple question from a logical question. these happening aren't being answered in afghanistan. questions such as, are these programs in buildings needed? have you asked the afghans if they want them? have you court made it but then at the other organizations working with the u.s. government or international community? have we designed them to meet any specific need that the afghans have? and have we designed them in such a way that they can be sustainable in the future? quite often we find the answers to these que
increased flexibility to create efficiencies and achieve results. lastly, congress should not impose maintenance of effort provisions of states as a condition of receiving federal funding. in other words, it states receive federal cuts, washington should not demand the same level of service without providing the same level of funding. essentially, all of these points can and will be coming down to flexibility and partnership. we need the flexibility to take care of the unique needs of our citizens and the challenges of our states. what we do not need is a one- size-fits-all solution or more unfunded federal mandates passed on to our states. the need to be treated as partners, not underlings. we want to work to implement good public policy. as we told congressional leaders, reducing the deficit by shifting costs to the state is not indicative of the good partnership. whether it is deficit reduction or other pressing national issues, we feel the two principles will guide these relationships with the federal government and the state. the principles are the flexibility and the partnershi
, the dynamics of a region as they are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for this committee to finally do the work it should have done for years. when you read the report, and you realize we have never done an authorization, we have never looked at how foreign aid is spent, never done a top to bottom review. i know it's something that people like you look at as something that is healthy, and can be done in partnership. i know there was some mention of cost. and i was really disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of two people that i respect was money, money, money. the fact is the this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spend, or if that could have prevented what happened in benghazi. so i look at this as a tremendous opportunity, and i want to close, again, by thanking you for your service, for your friendship, for your transparency, and i certainly look forward to your testimony. i know it will be presented in a way that will be constructive and helpful to us in the future, thank you. >> thank y
of the region as they really are today. and then lastly, i think this is an opportunity this committee to finally do the work that it should have been doing for years. when you read the arb report and you realize we have never done an authorization of the state department in the six years that i've been here, we've never looked how foreign aid has been spent. we have never done a top to bottom review, i know it is something people like you who come to this position look at something that is healthy and can be done in partnership. i know there was some mention of costs and, i was really disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of two people that i respect was money, money, money. the fact is this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spent or that could have prevented what happened in benghazi because we've never done an authorization. so i look at this as a tremendous opportunity. i want to close again by thanking you for your service, thanking you for your friendship, thanking you for your transparency, and i ce
policy that reflects, again, the dynamics of the region as they really are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for the committee to finally do the work that it should have been doing for years. when you read the record and realize we have never done an authorization of the state department in the six years i have been here, we have never looked at how foreign aid has been spent. we have never done a top to bottom review. it is something people like you come to this position, look at as something that is healthy. there was mention of cost. i was disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of people i respect was money, money, money. this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spent or if that could have prevented what was happening -- what happened because we have never had an authorization. i want to close again by thanking you for your service, thanking you for your friendship, thanking you for your transparency, and i certainly look forward to your testimony. i know it will be presented in a way that
. >> let me just lastly mention, you mentioned darfur in your opening comments. the humantarian crisis was so severe. we still have concerns in the southern and blue nile south sudan still has problems. burma where we had hope in november, there has not been progress made. i hope that you will make these areas where there is -- humanitarian crises a highest priority to try to protect the safety of the people that live in these areas. >> i will. i intend to do that. first of all the president, i think, will continue to -- with an appointment of the special envoy to the sudan, we just had princeton lyman, who's done a great job under tough circumstances. i was there myself during the course of their referendum on the independence. i have met with their president many times. i met not with bashir but people underneath him in the north. and my hope is that we can get the status of the number of components of the c.p.a. that were not fulfilled finally fulfilled. by nile, and others are human tragedy. the bombings are continuing. starvation taking place. displacement. and in some ways darfur
agitating the u.s. and its allies into conflict. and lastly, there is the issue of the size of their nukes. there is no indication that the north koreans have created a nuclear weapon small enough to ride on top of these rockets that. is a huge challenge that takes a lot of work. they are not there yet. that's one of the reasons many intelligence analysts are being looking at these very sharp words, wolf, as secretary panetta suggested, you have to be serious about it but it's probably just an empty threat at this point. >> good explanation, tom. thank you. >>> and joining us now, the abc news global affair's anchor, christiane amanpour. how credible are these threats coming out of north korea? >> they are credible as threats and they hope to make these a deterrent but when it comes to could they actually and do they intend to launch anything against the united states? the consensus is no. not only do they not have the ability to invade, but they don't have the ability on long-range missiles and they are not considered to have the ability to put a nuclear warhead on a missile. the problem,
, came to are a bit edgy not done so, and her husband as well, others i think would have died. lastly, the woman who i believe stop the initial wounds and injuries and murdered, and that's -- i call her a hero. she said so-called hero. she's a woman of action because she grabbed that extended magazine and prevented the shooter from reloading. otherwise many more people would have died that day. i was a strong supporter of the second amendment. i believe as the chairman said we should not be about trying to take away guns at all from responsible gun owners, but we have to do something after what happened in tucson and all the other mass tragedies including of course the terrible tragedy in newtown. we have to do something. we have no right to be here unless we do something. i'm confident, try to undo your leadership we have not only seen but will continue to hear from so many diverse voices that inform the work we have to do here. we have heard from people who are in favor of change and people who are opposed to change, and all in between. so i appreciate the opportunity to hear from o
in somalia. somalia has a long way to go but the fact that president is on was hit lastly, that our secretary of state formally announced the recognition of that government, this is inconceivable just a few years ago. i think again that's where we are at our best. not necessarily leading, supporting, training, equipping, helping in ways that the africans ask us to help. that's what we do best. >> good afternoon. i am with the institute for policy studies, and just really want to applaud the center for hosting this event, bring us together the week of an incredible inauguration and celebration of martin luther king day, to be able to talk about foreign policy. so i thank you for your vision. commander hamm, there's so many areas as she spoke that i thought i want to quibble on and question. i guess at the core of it when you talk about the state department giving at the 9 billion the department of defense giving 500 million to africa, it seems a bit disingenuous. primarily because the state department covers funds for private military contractors, that many would think are covered by the depar
right now, what should my expected return be in 2013? >> i think about 6%. >> lastly, you were out in december joining a number of other people saying you were aggressively investing in the japanese equity market, the nikkei, as a result of what's happening there. expected return in the nikkei over the next 12 months? >> that's a tough one. the nikkei was a fantastically good investment about six weeks ago. it's up about 23% in just that short period. it's hard to be that in love with it right now on a short-term basis. but even so i think the nikkei can go up over 20% this year. >> obviously significantly better than the other indices -- other asset classes we discussed. last year you talked about apple. you're not a stock guy, you're a bond guy but you used credit analysis and you talked about you more or less top ticked apple in terms of the short-term trading given the concerns. tell us what you think of that stock right now and are there other equity investments out there that you see similar types of concerns about massively overcrowded trades? >> apple i think is in a consol
to create efficiencies and achieve results. lastly, congress should not impose minutes of of the provisions on states as a condition of receiving federal funding. in other words, if state receive federal cuts, washington should not demand the same level of service without providing the same level of funding. essentially, all of these points can and will be coming boil down to two words. flexibility and partnership. we need the flexibility to take care of the unique needs of our citizens and the unique challenges of our states. what we do not need is a one- size-fits-all solution or more unfunded federal mandates passed on to our states. the need to be treated as partners, not underlings. we want to work to implement good public policy. as we told congressional leaders, reducing the deficit by shifting costs to the state is not indicative of the good partnership. whether it is deficit reduction or other pressing national issues, we feel the two principles will guide these relationships with the federal government and the state. the principles are the flexibility and the partnership. i will g
for the jobs of the future. lastly, on your question regarding what is the magic plan out there on how to solve the debt -- i don't think there is one. i think it is going to take all of us working together with the president to come up with the balanced approach. no one person, i think, has the answer. and it is going to require all of us coming to the table, debating these issues in ways that keep the people of this country at the forefront and coming up with the best answer possible to move our country forward. host: on twitter -- as you were ben wants to know how the housing industry is doing in nevada. guest: nevada lead the nation in the house of foreclosure and my -- was bump worst hit. the city of north las vegas we have the highest rate of home foreclosures in the country for some time. now, good news, our home values are beginning to creep back up. there is a report out this week that said home values will continue to increase in 2013. but the problem right now is those who bought their homes who did not lose them to foreclosure, nearly 60 percent of them in southern nevada are underw
are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for the committee to finally do the work that it should have been doing for years. when you read the record and realize we have never done an authorization of the state department in the six years i have been here, we have never looked at how foreign aid has been spent. we have never done a top to bottom review. it is something people like you come to this position, look at as something that is healthy. there was mention of cost. i was disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of people i respect was money, money, money. this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spent or if that could have prevented what was happening -- what happened because we have never had an authorization. i want to close again by thanking you for your service, thanking you for your friendship, thanking you for your transparency, and i certainly look forward to your testimony. i know it will be presented in a way that will be constructive and helpful for us in the future. >> thank you. we welcom
. and lastly we established an improved process for allowing workers to serve our nation's workforce needs while simultaneously protecting old workers. other bipartisan groups and senators have stood in the same spot before, trumping similar proposals. we believe this will be the year congress finally gets this done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever there are more oppositions to immigration reform fan support. -- there is more support than opposition for immigration reform. our colleagues are making a significant statement about the need to fix the broken immigration system. we do not want immigration as a walk -- as a wage issue. we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problem and becomes law. we recognize that in order to pass bipartisan legislation none of us can get everything we want. that is why our from works as we can address the status of people living here legally while at the same time securing our borders and create an immigration enforcement system that ensures that we will not again confront another 11 million people coming he
. the saudis would line the zerts with arrows saying this way. lastly, i'm running out of time, i hope, perhaps you will resist from applauding at six-minute mark, or at least the 60% who are not sympathetic to our view and drown out the others. this is a regime that has threaten to annihilate israel and expressed its intentions to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a tenl nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better henry kissinge re did not get away with it either. >> thank you for that intro duction. it is a -- introduction it is a pleasure being here. it goes without saying that the world would be better if iran does not become a nuclear arms state. achieving that goal should be our principle priority going forward. however, despite o
? and isn't the federal prisons growing out of more rapid -- >> yes. >> and lastly, will the federal establishment be as sensitive to the economic issues as the states are? >> yeah, no, that's an important set of questions. i don't talk about the federal system as much because they are on the opposite trajectory. so the federal system, as was just mentioned, is actually expanding. the bureau of prisons' budget actually expanded this past, this past year. it is going kind of countercounter to the that the states are going in. and the aclu recently sponsored a couple of hearings in congress where state leaders from states that actually have enacted significant reform presented the story of what had happened in their states and trying to kind of poet sate reform in the federal -- motivate reform in the federal system. the reality is that the economic pressures facing the states and state governments don't exist in the same way as they do with the federal government. so the federal government isn't feeling that same pinch. they -- state governments have to balance their budget. the feder
would line the desert with directional arrows saying this way to tehran. lastly and i'm running out of time i hope perhaps you'll resist from applauding at the six-minute mark or at least the 60% of you who are sympathetic to our view, drown out the others, is that this is a regime that has threatened to annihilate israel and expressed its intention to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a continental nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better henry kissinger re did not get away with it either. >> thank you for that introduction. it is a -- introduction it is a pleasure being here. it goes without saying that the world would be better if iran does not become a nuclear arms state. achieving that goal should be our principle pr
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